Day Camp

Our program grows as your child grows. Here is what you can look forward to this summer…

At Pierce, our campers can look forward to NEW and exciting programming from year to year as they “climb the ladder” with us. We want to share with you some of the big differences in our camp-wide program as our campers move up from our five-year-old groups and enter our six-year-old curriculum.

    • At the age of 6, the boys groups have an all male staff: General Counselors and Group Leaders.Summer 2016
    • Our 6’s move up to our beautiful Intermediate Pool with double chute water slides.
    • League Play – Our athletic program makes a significant jump forward with more intramural play!
    • Bowling – Once every 10 days, our 6’s will enjoy a short field trip for bowling…They love it!
    • Archery – A camp favorite is now enjoyed by all of our 6’s!
    • Sky-Fly – Our zip lines over our pond are scheduled and enjoyed…
    • Cranium Club (S.T.E.M) – Air conditioned and very creative, our new STEM program has become hugely popular. Another creative offering this year is called CLUB TUNES!
    • Summer 2016Bungee – Enjoyed by all… Now scheduled weekly for 6’s!
    • Tennis and Volleyball – These sports now becomes part of their weekly schedules
    • The 6’s Pow Wow is now at night! Complete with our famous Jump Through the Hoop of Fire!
Summer 2016

Food Allergies

One in every 13 children in the U.S. is affected by food allergies or intolerances. In a camp of 300 children, that means as many as 23 children may require special meal preparation.

All food allergies are not created equal. If a child with a peanut allergy is exposed to peanuts, it is often a life-threatening situation requiring immediate medical attention. If a child with celiac disease is exposed to gluten, they will likely have abdominal discomfort and associated symptoms, which may not occur until 72 hours after the exposure.

Handling food allergies effectively requires coordination of safe food handling, meal preparation, meal provision and dealing with exposure, so having a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) is considered best practice. Only an RDN has multiple layers of nutrition education and is considered the expert in handling such serious nutrition issues. Many camps are staffing nutrition professionals to handle everything from meal planning to gluten-free meal preparation to carbohydrate counting for campers with diabetes. If you do not have a nutrition professional on staff, some basic facts regarding food allergies are included below.

What is a food allergy?
An abnormal response to a food triggered by our body’s immune system resulting in symptoms.

An allergic reaction occurs when the immune system attacks a food protein that is normally harmless. The body responds by producing large amounts of histamine, which can result in symptoms that can be life threatening. These symptoms may include: swelling of the mouth, throat and tongue, difficulty breathing, lowered blood pressure and gastrointestinal distress.

A true food allergy is not the same as a food intolerance. The term “food intolerance” encompasses any adverse reaction to a food source that is not caused by an immune response.

What are the most common food allergies?
The following eight foods account for 90 percent of all food allergies: peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish, fish, eggs, milk, soy and wheat.

How many people do they affect?
Nearly 8 percent of school-age children suffer from food allergies.

How to provide safe meals?

  • Prepare meals for those with allergies in a separate area using pots, pans, toasters and utensils kept for those foods only.
  • Wash your hands and all surfaces prior to preparing meals.
  • Use squeeze bottles for condiments to avoid putting contaminated utensils into a jar.
  • Read all food labels; allergens can be found in many unexpected places, including seasonings and condiments.

What do you do if accidental exposure occurs?
Understand which allergy or intolerance you are dealing with.

For allergies that result in anaphylaxis, epinephrine, in the form of an EpiPen, is the medication of choice for controlling a severe reaction.

For milder reactions, an antihistamine may be adequate.

For accidental exposure to gluten, there is often no need for intervention. Celiac disease is a delayed hypersensitivity reaction. Symptoms generally occur 48 to 72 hours after exposure and may present as abdominal pain, bloating, and/or diarrhea.

It is becoming increasing popular to follow a gluten-free diet. For some it is for a true celiac disease, which is an autoimmune disease that leads to damage of the small intestine with gluten ingestion. For others, there is a perceived health or weight loss benefit. In order to provide healthy gluten-free meals (not just pre-made, frozen meals) in an environment free of cross contamination, the staff preparing and providing the meals must be educated. The following link is a great resource for camps providing this service: http://www.celiaccentral.org/Courses/GREAT-Schools-Colleges-Camps/1053/

Caring for other people’s children is an immense responsibility. Providing safe and healthy meals is one of the most important aspects of a safe and healthy summer. Best wishes for a healthy Camp Season 2016!

Camp: The Old Neighborhood for a New Generation

Spring is in the air and we are looking ahead at our 99th summer here at Pierce Country Day Camp! I came across this terrific article in Camping Magazine which discusses the values of camp and the teachings of 21st Century Skills, which we promote here at Pierce.

Check out the article here!

Happenings at Pierce

Greetings from Camp!

We are very pleased to announce,

Doug Pierce will be receiving the prestigious “Legends of Camping” award from American Camp Association.

Doug Pierce

Doug will be inducted into the elite group of Legends of Camping at the Conrad Hotel in New York City at the upcoming annual SCOPE dinner in April. SCOPE – Summer Camp Opportunities Promote Education is an independent, non-profit organization committed to providing camp and college scholarships to low-income, inner-city children. To date, SCOPE has provided over 25,000 scholarships since its inception in 1991. Doug, a co-founder of SCOPE, currently serves on its board of directors. The evening will also be a proud celebration of SCOPE’s 25th Anniversary. The Legends Award is among the highest honors the American Camp Association awards to members who personify commitment and passion for camp and community. “I am very proud to be inducted into the Legends of Camping,” states Doug. “I am deeply honored to join such an outstanding group, and to have been nominated by my professional peers.”

Courtney Pierce assumes the role of President of LICAPS – Long Island Camps and Private Schools.

Courtney Pierce

Courtney Pierce, a Director at Pierce Country Day Camp, has been elected President of The Long Island Association of Private Schools and Day Camps (LICAPS). LICAPS, founded some 60 years ago, is a professional association of the premier private summer day camps on Long Island. Approximately 25 camps from both Nassau and Suffolk Counties are currently members. Courtney is the fifth Pierce family member to be elected President of LICAPS following her grandfather who was a founding member, her father Doug and her uncles Greg and Forrester. LICAPS is dedicated to Health, Education and Recreation, while promoting best practices in the field.

Courtney, working alongside her cousin Will, is currently a Director at Pierce Country Day Camp. Courtney and Will represent fourth generation Pierce family members at the helm as Pierce approaches its 99th summer season in 2016!

New in 2016

What’s New in 2016!?

Hello from Camp!

We have been having a blast putting the finishing touches on what surely will be a summer to remember. We have always re-invested in our operation at very high levels to ensure that the summer experience offered at Pierce is second to none. Take a look at some of the new things you will find this year at camp; we think that you are really going to like it here! Continue reading